17th century findings in New York City

Last week, Andrew Agha and Nicole Isenbarger were in New York City to present at a conference at The Brooklyn Museum, and while visiting the museum they noticed some useful information for our research of the 17th century and Lord Ashley.

Last summer we recovered a fragment of 17th c. tableglass that looked very similar to ones Lord Ashley 17th c. Tableglassmade by the British firm of Measley and Greene between 1665 and 1675, which we included in our blog:

https://lordashleysite.wordpress.com/2013/06/18/another-day-in-the-trenches/

The Brooklyn Museum has additional 17th century examples of tableglass on display that also have a similar stem shape. These examples further show the popularity of this vessel form during the 17th century.

British Tableglass c.1685 from the collections of The Brooklyn Museum

British Tableglass c.1685 from the collections of The Brooklyn Museum

British drinking vessel, c.1685 from the collections of The Brooklyn Museum

British drinking vessel, c.1685 from the collections of The Brooklyn Museum

Covered Goblet c.1685 from the collections at The Brooklyn Museum

Covered Goblet c.1685 from the collections at The Brooklyn Museum

c. 1675 Kitchen at the Jan Martense Schenck House, Brooklyn, NY at The Brooklyn Museum

c. 1675 Kitchen at the Jan Martense Schenck House, Brooklyn, NY at The Brooklyn Museum

We also saw their exhibits on early architecture and culture where they take the actual materials from historic structures and re-create entire rooms for you to see including floorboards, walls, ceilings, furniture, and the material culture. The exterior of the exhibit mimics the exterior of the houses and you get to peer in through windows and doorways to see what a home of that time period looked like. One of the homes on display was from the Jan Martense Schenck Home, a c.1675 Dutch home in Brooklyn, NY. Displays like this help place the material culture we recover in their historical setting. During the 17th century the North Room was used as both the best room and the master bedchamber. Notice that the bed is placed along the back wall near the fireplace to provide added warmth (photo below).

Great room exhibit from the Jan Martense Schenck House c.1675 Brooklyn, NY at The Brooklyn Museum

Great room exhibit from the Jan Martense Schenck House c.1675 Brooklyn, NY at The Brooklyn Museum

We had a wonderful visit to New York City and unexpectedly learned more about the seventeenth century! Information like this helps us enrich our understanding of the lives of the people who lived and worked at the Lord Ashley Site.

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About nicoleisenbarger

Hello! I am an Anthropologist who has been doing Historical Archaeology in the Southeast for over 15 years. My interests include the African Diaspora, Colonoware pottery studies, early Colonial studies, and healthy living. I enjoy working out, cooking healthy foods, reading, music, traveling, and spending time with my husband and my cat Crystal (a.k.a. my personal assistant as she is normally in my lap or by my side).
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